Thursday, November 15, 2012

Dyspareunia


Dyspareunia

This term describes the situation where sexual intercourse is painful, the pain can range from mild discomfort to severe pain that makes intercourse impossible penetration. Pain may be sharp, like a burning, dull or intense and can be felt during and / or immediately after intercourse.

Pain during intercourse can be superficial or deep and the overwhelming majority of cases the cause is organic. Thus, superficial pain can be caused by a fungal vulvo-vaginitis, genital herpes or inflammation of the vulvar vestibule. Sensitivity to condoms or spermicides may also be associated with superficial dyspareunia. Last but not least be mentioned spastic muscle contractions (vaginismus) as a condition for superficial dyspareunia, and lack of excitement.

In the absence of sufficient excitement labia minora is not congested and can be driven by the Introit during vaginal penetration, causing discomfort.
Deep dyspareunia may be associated with endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease but also with the lack of sufficient excitement (more common than you might think). Insufficient arousal can cause pain and discomfort in the absence of lubrication but also by the absence of characteristic changes of the vaginal walls and uterus (vaginal walls stretching and relaxation powerful 1/3 of their top and lifting the uterus).
Dyspareunia
Menopause is a physiological condition often associated with either shallow or deep dyspareunia because, in the absence of estrogen, genital structures in excitation reaction is slower but less extensive.
Pain (like bleeding) during or immediately after sexual intercourse should always be discussed with a doctor. Treating any infection can be solve in some cases, in others but the solution may be changing position or using lubricants.
 Dyspareunia

Unfortunately, when sex is synonymous with pain installs a vicious circle and the woman will end up totally refuse sex. Therefore, once you have solved treated pain and mental association between sex and pain. Most times, good communication within the couple can solve this problem but sometimes you may need sex therapy.

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